Bill would ban certain sales of dogs, cats and rabbits in pet stores in Pennsylvania

HE WAS RESPONDING TO A FIRE EARLY MORNING WHEN THE BUILDING WHEN THE BUILDING HE WAS STATED IN COLLAPMED. WILLIAMSON WAS A 27-YEAR VETERAN WITH THE PHILADELPHIA FIRE DEPARTMENT. HIS FUNERAL IS NOW SET FOR MONDAY. LORI: IT’S TODAY IN HARRISBURG. LAWYERS GATHER TO APPEAL FOR SUPPORT OF BILL KNOWN AS ‘THE VICTORIA LAW’. THIS LEGISLATION WOULD END THE SALE OF DOGS, CATS AND RABBITS AS PETS THROUGHOUT THE COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA. INSTEAD, IT WO

Supporters are pushing for a bill banning the sale of dogs, cats and rabbits in pet stores in Pennsylvania

Lawyers will gather at the Pennsylvania Capitol on Tuesday to support a bill known as Victoria’s Law. The legislation would end the sale of dogs, cats and rabbits in Pennsylvania pet stores. Instead, the law would only allow the adoption of rescue animals through a pet store. partnerships. Victoria’s law would also require kennel license transparency on all advertisements for the sale of dogs. The rally is scheduled for 1 p.m. Tuesday. The dog was paralyzed due to a genetic and neurological disorder called degenerative myelopathy. She transmitted the same disease to 150 to 200 puppies she produced at the puppy mill, according to a blog posted on Pasenategop.com. The bill is sponsored by Pennsylvania State Senator Kirsten Phillips-Hill, a Republican representing York County.

Lawyers will gather at the Pennsylvania Capitol on Tuesday to support a bill known as Victoria’s Law.

The legislation would end the sale of dogs, cats and rabbits in Pennsylvania pet stores.

Instead, the law would only allow the adoption of rescue animals through partnerships with pet stores.

Victoria’s law would also require kennel license transparency on all advertisements for the sale of dogs.

The rally is scheduled for Tuesday at 1 p.m.

Background to Victoria Law

The proposed law is named after Victoria, a German Shepherd rescued from a Pennsylvania puppy mill after 10 years of breeding.

The dog was paralyzed due to a genetic and neurological disorder called degenerative myelopathy. She transmitted the same disease to 150 to 200 puppies she produced at the puppy mill, according to a blog posted on Pasenategop.com.

The bill is sponsored by Pennsylvania State Senator Kirsten Phillips-Hill, a Republican representing York County.